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radio controlled model boats, R/C, scale, BaD, Dumas, Crockett, Monterey, Warship, ship, model, 1/96, wood, balsa, plank, strip, craftsmanship

Making a working RADAR
by Roger Harper

Working RADAR is an easy effect to add to your ship.  Rotating RADAR adds to the realism.   You don't need a masters degree to engineer a system to rotate your RADAR. 

The first step is, RADAR rotates in a CLOCKWISE direction.   No matter if it's a high speed, or low speed, it still rotates CLOCKWISE!  

The easiest way to set up a working RADAR is to use an old servo.  To do this, open the servo case and remove the Pot stop or pin so it's motor can rotate the drive gear a full 360 degree turns.  I recommend to remove the motor leads from the circuit board, then solder new lead wires to the motor terminals.   This will bypass the servo electronics, allowing you to only power the motor.

I have found that 1.5v gives me great results when powering the servo motor.  Depending on the type of RADAR you plan to model, know what the rotation speed is because they all have different rotation rates.  For example, the AN/SPS-49 RADAR has a rotation rate of 6 or 12 RPM, while the  AN/SPS-64 has a rotation speed up to 33 RPM. 

sur_an49.jpg (11139 bytes)
AN/SPS-49 RADAR

RADARs are mounted in numerous locations on ships.  Depending on the type of ship, you may run into problems setting up the drive for your RADAR. 

Most warships have it mounted on a mast while fishing trawlers have it mounted on the pilot house roof.  Plan your strategy accordingly.

The flex shaft I use is from a small wire cable used for push rods in R/C aircraft.  This flex shaft allows the scanner to move if it is bumped, without it braking.

The figure below is an example of an easy RADAR hook up.
radar1.gif (3096 bytes)

Another way is to run the cable inside of a mast.  This requires you to make a hollow mast.  I make these masts out of brass tubing allowing me to keep the weight low.

radar2.gif (2743 bytes)

You  can  send a tip here, or send Email to: roger@rktman.com

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